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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2009, Article ID 594678, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/594678
Review Article

MicroRNA-Biogenesis and Pre-mRNA Splicing Crosstalk

1Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv, Israel
2Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA

Received 27 March 2009; Accepted 18 May 2009

Academic Editor: Zhumur Ghosh

Copyright © 2009 Noam Shomron and Carmit Levy. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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