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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 137817, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/137817
Research Article

Epo Is Relevant Neither for Microvascular Formation Nor for the New Formation and Maintenance of Mice Skeletal Muscle Fibres in Both Normoxia and Hypoxia

1Laboratoire “Réponses Cellulaires et Fonctionnelles à l'hypoxie”, Université Paris 13, EA 2363, 97017 Bobigny, France
2Laboratoire Stress et Pathologies du Cytosquelette, Unité de Biologie Adaptative et Fonctionnelle, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7 CNRS, 75013 Paris, France
3Université Paris-Descartes, 75015 Paris, France

Received 30 October 2009; Revised 28 January 2010; Accepted 9 February 2010

Academic Editor: Aikaterini Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos

Copyright © 2010 Luciana Hagström et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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