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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 187621, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/187621
Research Article

A Human Recombinant Autoantibody-Based Immunotoxin Specific for the Fetal Acetylcholine Receptor Inhibits Rhabdomyosarcoma Growth In Vitro and in a Murine Transplantation Model

1Institute of Pathology, University of Würzburg, 97080 Würzburg, Germany
2Department of Pharmaceutical Product Development, Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology, Forckenbeckstraße 6, 52074 Aachen, Germany
3Neurosciences Group, Department of Clinical Neurology, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, OX3 9DU Oxford, UK
4Hellenic Pasteur Institute, 127, Vas. Sofias Avenue 11521, Athens, Greece
5Department of Pediatric Oncology, Olga Hospital, 70176 Stuttgart, Germany
6Department of Experimental Medicine and Immunotherapy, Helmholtz-Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstraße 20, 52074 Aachen, Germany
7Institute of Pathology, University Medical Center Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Theodor-Kutzer Ufer 1-3, 68135 Mannheim, Greece

Received 14 August 2009; Accepted 18 November 2009

Academic Editor: Rene Anand

Copyright © 2010 S. Gattenlöhner et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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