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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2010, Article ID 576318, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/576318
Review Article

Evidence for Maternal-Fetal Genotype Incompatibility as a Risk Factor for Schizophrenia

Departments of Psychiatry, and Biobehavioral Sciences and Human Genetics, UCLA Semel Institute, 760 Westwood Plaza, Room 47-422, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA

Received 17 September 2009; Revised 9 February 2010; Accepted 20 February 2010

Academic Editor: Robert Elston

Copyright © 2010 Christina G. S. Palmer. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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