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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 124595, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/124595
Review Article

Herpesvirus BACs: Past, Present, and Future

1Department of Molecular Medicine, City of Hope National Medical Center and Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA 91010, USA
2Department of Microbiology/AIDS Research Program, Ponce School of Medicine, 395 Zona Industrial, Reparada 2, Ponce, PR 00716-2348, USA
3Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, UMDNJ-New Jersey Medical School, 225 Warren Street, Newark, NJ 07101-1709, USA

Received 20 May 2010; Accepted 19 August 2010

Academic Editor: Masamitsu Yamaguchi

Copyright © 2011 Charles Warden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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