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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 174306, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/174306
Review Article

Ion Transport by Pulmonary Epithelia

Institute of Animal Physiology, Justus Liebig University Giessen, Wartweg 95, 35392 Giessen, Germany

Received 1 July 2011; Accepted 16 August 2011

Academic Editor: Frederick D. Quinn

Copyright © 2011 Monika I. Hollenhorst et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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