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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 672369, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/672369
Research Article

Manipulation of pH Shift to Enhance the Growth and Antibiotic Activity of Xenorhabdus nematophila

1Research and Development Center of Biorational Pesticides, College of Plant Protection, Northwest A & F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100, China
2School of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia

Received 2 September 2010; Accepted 19 March 2011

Academic Editor: Ali Khraibi

Copyright © 2011 Yonghong Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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