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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 721213, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/721213
Review Article

Bioactive Food Components and Cancer-Specific Metabonomic Profiles

Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA

Received 16 June 2010; Revised 29 September 2010; Accepted 5 October 2010

Academic Editor: Olav Kvalheim

Copyright © 2011 Young S. Kim and John A. Milner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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