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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2011, Article ID 984505, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/984505
Review Article

Common Fragile Site Tumor Suppressor Genes and Corresponding Mouse Models of Cancer

1Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 , USA
2Clinical Pathology, Regina Elena Institute, IFO, 00144 Rome, Italy
3 Department of Immunology and Cancer Research-IMRIC, The Lautenberg Center for General and Tumor Immunology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem 91120, Israel

Received 14 September 2010; Accepted 23 November 2010

Academic Editor: Monica Fedele

Copyright © 2011 Alessandra Drusco et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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