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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012, Article ID 452934, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/452934
Review Article

Lysine Acetylation: Elucidating the Components of an Emerging Global Signaling Pathway in Trypanosomes

1Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, Rosario 2000, Argentina
2Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Suipacha 590, Rosario 2000, Argentina

Received 17 April 2012; Revised 20 July 2012; Accepted 30 July 2012

Academic Editor: Andrea Silvana Rópolo

Copyright © 2012 Victoria Lucia Alonso and Esteban Carlos Serra. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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