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Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 903435, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/903435
Review Article

Roles of p53 in Various Biological Aspects of Hematopoietic Stem Cells

1Division of Molecular and Clinical Genetics, Medical Institute of Bioregulation, Kyushu University, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan
2Department of Advanced Molecular and Cell Therapy, Kyushu University Hospital, 3-1-1, Maidashi, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan

Received 22 March 2012; Accepted 14 May 2012

Academic Editor: Masamitsu Yamaguchi

Copyright © 2012 Takenobu Nii et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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