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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 273498, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/273498
Research Article

The Steady-State Serum Concentration of Genistein Aglycone Is Affected by Formulation: A Bioequivalence Study of Bone Products

1Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Messina, 98125 Messina, Italy
2Department of Medical Education and Scientific Affairs, Primus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA
3Section of Physiology and Human Nutrition, Department of Biochemical, Physiological and Nutritional Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
4Department of Obstetrical and Gynecological Sciences, University of Messina, Messina, Italy
5Department of Clinical Affairs, Primus Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ, USA

Received 30 July 2012; Revised 19 November 2012; Accepted 21 November 2012

Academic Editor: Fátima Regina Mena Barreto Silva

Copyright © 2013 Alessandra Bitto et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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