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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 484613, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/484613
Review Article

Role of Redox Signaling in Neuroinflammation and Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Department of Nursing, Division of Basic Medical Sciences, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan
2Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Health Aging Research Center, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-San, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Received 11 September 2013; Revised 30 October 2013; Accepted 21 November 2013

Academic Editor: Sulagna Das

Copyright © 2013 Hsi-Lung Hsieh and Chuen-Mao Yang. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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