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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 729281, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/729281
Research Article

αVβ5 and CD44 Are Oxygen-Regulated Human Embryonic Stem Cell Attachment Factors

Guy Hilton Research Centre, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine, University of Keele, Thornburrow Drive, Hartshill, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire ST4 7QB, UK

Received 29 April 2013; Revised 19 September 2013; Accepted 4 October 2013

Academic Editor: Louise E. Glover

Copyright © 2013 Deepak Kumar et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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