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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 762303, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/762303
Research Article

Site-Specific Distribution of CD68-Positive Microglial Cells in the Brains of Human Midterm Fetuses: A Topographical Relationship with Growing Axons

1Department of Neurology, Jeonbuk Regional Cardiocerebrovascular Disease Center, Institute of Wonkwang Medical Science, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan 570-711, Republic of Korea
2Department of Anatomy, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, 634-18 Geumam-dong, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-712, Republic of Korea
3Department of Anatomy, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita 010-8502, Japan
4Division of Internal Medicine, Iwamizawa Kojin-kai Hospital, Iwamizawa 068-0833, Japan
5Department of Surgery, Chonbuk National University School of Medicine, 634-18 Geumam-dong, Deokjin-gu, Jeonju 561-712, Republic of Korea

Received 19 August 2013; Revised 21 November 2013; Accepted 25 November 2013

Academic Editor: Anton M. Jetten

Copyright © 2013 Kwang Ho Cho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Using 5 fetuses of gestational age (GA) of 15-16 weeks and 4 of GA of 22–25 weeks, we examined site- and stage-dependent differences in CD68-positive microglial cell distribution in human fetal brains. CD68 positive cells were evident in the floor of the fourth ventricle and the pons and olive at 15-16 weeks, accumulating in and around the hippocampus at 22–25 weeks. At both stages, the accumulation of these cells was evident around the optic tract and the anterior limb of the internal capsule. When we compared CD68-positive cell distribution with the topographical anatomy of GAP43-positive developing axons, we found that positive axons were usually unaccompanied by CD68-positive cells, except in the transpontine corticofugal tract and the anterior limb of the internal capsule. Likewise, microglial cell distribution did not correspond with habenulointerpeduncular tract. Therefore, the distribution of CD68-positive cells during normal brain development may not reflect a supportive role of these microglia in axonogenesis of midterm human fetuses.