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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 793673, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/793673
Research Article

Enhanced Intensity Dependence as a Marker of Low Serotonergic Neurotransmission in High Optimistic College Students

1Medical Psychological Institute, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, No. 139, Middle Renmin Road, Changsha, Hunan 410011, China
2Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australia

Received 24 August 2013; Revised 10 November 2013; Accepted 25 November 2013

Academic Editor: Eva Widerstrom-Noga

Copyright © 2013 Jibiao Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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