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BioMed Research International
Volume 2013, Article ID 812641, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/812641
Research Article

Neuroprotective Effect of Ginseng against Alteration of Calcium Binding Proteins Immunoreactivity in the Mice Hippocampus after Radiofrequency Exposure

Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Dankook Translational Research Center, Dankook University, 119 Dandaero, Anseo-dong, Dongnam-gu, Cheonan, Chungnam 330-714, Republic of Korea

Received 10 June 2013; Accepted 23 July 2013

Academic Editor: Thomas Van Groen

Copyright © 2013 Dhiraj Maskey et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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