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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 127548, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/127548
Clinical Study

The Effects of Single-Dose Rectal Midazolam Application on Postoperative Recovery, Sedation, and Analgesia in Children Given Caudal Anesthesia Plus Bupivacaine

1Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Kanuni Education and Research Hospital, 61290 Trabzon, Turkey
2Department of Anesthesiology and Reanimation, Faculty of Medicine, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon, Turkey

Received 4 December 2013; Revised 7 March 2014; Accepted 9 April 2014; Published 5 May 2014

Academic Editor: Engin Erturk

Copyright © 2014 Sedat Saylan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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