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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 129593, 9 pages
Research Article

Haemodynamic Monitoring in the Intensive Care Unit: Results from a Web-Based Swiss Survey

1Intensive Care Unit, Department of Anaesthesiology, Pharmacology and Intensive Care, University Hospitals of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland
2Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil, 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland
3Division of Clinical Epidemiology (Biostatistics), University Hospitals of Geneva, 4 Rue Gabrielle-Perret-Gentil 1211 Geneva 14, Switzerland

Received 5 February 2014; Accepted 25 March 2014; Published 22 April 2014

Academic Editor: Bruno Levy

Copyright © 2014 Nils Siegenthaler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Background. The aim of this survey was to describe, in a situation of growing availability of monitoring devices and parameters, the practices in haemodynamic monitoring at the bedside. Methods. We conducted a Web-based survey in Swiss adult ICUs (2009-2010). The questionnaire explored the kind of monitoring used and how the fluid management was addressed. Results. Our survey included 71% of Swiss ICUs. Echocardiography (95%), pulmonary artery catheter (PAC: 85%), and transpulmonary thermodilution (TPTD) (82%) were the most commonly used. TPTD and PAC were frequently both available, although TPTD was the preferred technique. Echocardiography was widely available (95%) but seems to be rarely performed by intensivists themselves. Guidelines for the management of fluid infusion were available in 45% of ICUs. For the prediction of fluid responsiveness, intensivists rely preferentially on dynamic indices or echocardiographic parameters, but static parameters, such as central venous pressure or pulmonary artery occlusion pressure, were still used. Conclusions. In most Swiss ICUs, multiple haemodynamic monitoring devices are available, although TPTD is most commonly used. Despite the usefulness of echocardiography and its large availability, it is not widely performed by Swiss intensivists themselves. Regarding fluid management, several parameters are used without a clear consensus for the optimal method.