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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 131737, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/131737
Review Article

Redox Signaling as a Therapeutic Target to Inhibit Myofibroblast Activation in Degenerative Fibrotic Disease

1Division of Experimental Urology, Department of Urology, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria
2Institute for Biomedical Aging Research, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria
3Department of Internal Medicine III, Innsbruck Medical University, Anichstrasse 35, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria

Received 5 October 2013; Accepted 6 January 2014; Published 20 February 2014

Academic Editor: David Vauzour

Copyright © 2014 Natalie Sampson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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