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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 136130, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/136130
Research Article

Essential Functional Modules for Pathogenic and Defensive Mechanisms in Candida albicans Infections

1Institute of Biomedical Informatics, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan
2Laboratory of Control and Systems Biology, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan
3Institute of Communications Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan
4Institute of Statistics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan
5Department of Life Science and Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan
6Department of Medical Science and Institute of Bioinformatics and Structural Biology, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan

Received 17 October 2013; Accepted 10 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Shigehiko Kanaya

Copyright © 2014 Yu-Chao Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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