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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 143283, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/143283
Research Article

Differences of Cytotoxicity of Orthodontic Bands Assessed by Survival Tests in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

1Department of Orthodontics, Dentistry Faculty, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Ipiranga 6681, Building 6, Room 209, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Immunology and Microbiology Laboratory, Biosciences Faculty, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Avenida Ipiranga 6681, Building 12, Lab 12D, 90619-900 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

Received 19 October 2013; Revised 6 December 2013; Accepted 7 December 2013; Published 6 January 2014

Academic Editor: Susana Viegas

Copyright © 2014 Tatiana Siqueira Gonçalves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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