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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 162423, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/162423
Research Article

Evaluating the Influence of Motor Control on Selective Attention through a Stochastic Model: The Paradigm of Motor Control Dysfunction in Cerebellar Patient

1Eye Tracking & Visual Application Lab, University of Siena, Viale Bracci 2, 53100 Siena, Italy
2Department of Neurological Sciences and Behavior, University of Siena, Viale Bracci 2, 53100 Siena, Italy

Received 29 April 2013; Revised 3 November 2013; Accepted 7 November 2013; Published 9 February 2014

Academic Editor: Hitoshi Mochizuki

Copyright © 2014 Giacomo Veneri et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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