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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 167024, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/167024
Review Article

Derailed Intraneuronal Signalling Drives Pathogenesis in Sporadic and Familial Alzheimer’s Disease

reMYND, Gaston Geenslaan 1, 3001 Leuven, Belgium

Received 9 May 2014; Revised 31 July 2014; Accepted 3 August 2014; Published 27 August 2014

Academic Editor: Yiying Zhang

Copyright © 2014 Tom Van Dooren et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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