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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 191767, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/191767
Research Article

Oxygen Radicals Elicit Paralysis and Collapse of Spinal Cord Neuron Growth Cones upon Exposure to Proinflammatory Cytokines

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 900 Yukon Drive, Reichardt Building, Room 194, Fairbanks, AK 99775-6150, USA

Received 16 October 2013; Revised 25 February 2014; Accepted 11 March 2014; Published 23 June 2014

Academic Editor: Tullia Maraldi

Copyright © 2014 Thomas B. Kuhn. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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