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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 201717, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/201717
Research Article

Prenatal Maternal Stress Predicts Childhood Asthma in Girls: Project Ice Storm

1University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada H2X 0A9
2University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada H3N 1X9
3Douglas Hospital Research Center, Montreal, QC, Canada H4H 1R3
4Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA
5Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
6Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA
7McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A1

Received 24 January 2014; Revised 11 April 2014; Accepted 11 April 2014; Published 8 May 2014

Academic Editor: Wenbin Liang

Copyright © 2014 Anne-Marie Turcotte-Tremblay et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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