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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 203425, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/203425
Research Article

Oleoylethanolamide: A Novel Potential Pharmacological Alternative to Cannabinoid Antagonists for the Control of Appetite

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology “V. Erspamer”, Sapienza University of Rome, Piazzale Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Roma, Italy
2Institute of Cell Biology and Neurobiology (IBCN), Italian National Research Council (CNR), Via del Fosso di Fiorano, 64-00146 Roma, Italy
3Genomnia Srl, Via Nerviano 31, Lainate, 20020 Milano, Italy

Received 25 November 2013; Revised 18 February 2014; Accepted 5 March 2014; Published 3 April 2014

Academic Editor: Andrew J. McAinch

Copyright © 2014 Adele Romano et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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