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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 215763, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/215763
Research Article

The Soluble Form of CTLA-4 from Serum of Patients with Autoimmune Diseases Regulates T-Cell Responses

1Section of Human Anatomy, Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Genoa, Via De Toni 14, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2Departments of Medicine and Cell Biology, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY 11030, USA
3Autoimmunity Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, 16132 Genoa, Italy
4Laboratory of Clinical Pathology, San Antonio Hospital, Tolmezzo, 33100 Udine, Italy

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 30 October 2013; Accepted 31 October 2013; Published 29 January 2014

Academic Editor: Koji Kawakami

Copyright © 2014 Rita Simone et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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