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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 231474, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/231474
Research Article

CD44 Gene Polymorphisms on Hepatocellular Carcinoma Susceptibility and Clinicopathologic Features

1Institute of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, 110 Chien-Kuo North Road, Section 1, Taichung 402, Taiwan
2Cancer Research Center, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua 500, Taiwan
3School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
4Department of Surgery, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan
5Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan
6School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
7Department of Internal Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung 402, Taiwan

Received 24 April 2014; Revised 13 May 2014; Accepted 15 May 2014; Published 27 May 2014

Academic Editor: Chia-Jui Weng

Copyright © 2014 Ying-Erh Chou et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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