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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 235781, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/235781
Review Article

Functional Development of the Circadian Clock in the Zebrafish Pineal Gland

1Department of Neurobiology, George S. Wise Faculty of Life Sciences and Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel-Aviv University, 69978 Tel-Aviv, Israel
2Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany

Received 26 January 2014; Accepted 13 March 2014; Published 16 April 2014

Academic Editor: Estela Muñoz

Copyright © 2014 Zohar Ben-Moshe et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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