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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 269402, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/269402
Research Article

Changes in Bacterial Population of Gastrointestinal Tract of Weaned Pigs Fed with Different Additives

1Centre de Recerca en Sanitat Animal (CReSA), UAB-IRTA, Campus de la Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
2Departament de Sanitat i Anatomia Animals, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
3Institut de Recerca i Tecnologia Agroalimentaria (IRTA), Caldes de Montbui, 08140 Barcelona, Spain
4Departament de Ciència Animal i dels Aliments, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain
5Servei d’Estadística (SEA), Edifici D, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain

Received 28 February 2013; Revised 15 November 2013; Accepted 27 November 2013; Published 19 January 2014

Academic Editor: William H. Piel

Copyright © 2014 Mercè Roca et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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