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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 285752, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/285752
Research Article

-Tocotrienol Oxazine Derivative Antagonizes Mammary Tumor Cell Compensatory Response to CoCl2-Induced Hypoxia

School of Pharmacy, University of Louisiana at Monroe, 700 University Avenue, Monroe, LA 71209-0470, USA

Received 20 May 2014; Revised 3 July 2014; Accepted 8 July 2014; Published 22 July 2014

Academic Editor: Jian-Li Gao

Copyright © 2014 Suryatheja Ananthula et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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