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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 291531, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/291531
Research Article

Transgenic Rat Model of Huntington’s Disease: A Histopathological Study and Correlations with Neurodegenerative Process in the Brain of HD Patients

1Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Charles University in Prague, Šimkova 870, P.O. Box 38, 500 38 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
2Department of Cellular Neurophysiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, The Academy of Sciences, Vídeňská 1083, 142 20 Prague, Czech Republic
3Department of Biological and Medical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovského 1203, 500 05 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic
4Department of Medical Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Králové, Charles University in Prague, Šimkova 870, P.O. Box 38, 500 38 Hradec Králové, Czech Republic

Received 9 May 2014; Revised 26 June 2014; Accepted 26 June 2014; Published 3 August 2014

Academic Editor: Mahendra P. Singh

Copyright © 2014 Yvona Mazurová et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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