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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 301575, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/301575
Review Article

The Role of Wnt Signaling in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

1Geriatrics Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China
2Shanghai Institute of Geriatrics, Huadong Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200040, China
3Department of Perinatal Medicine Pregnancy Research Centre and University of Melbourne Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Royal Women’s Hospital, Parkville, VIC 3052, Australia

Received 12 October 2013; Accepted 10 April 2014; Published 4 May 2014

Academic Editor: Raymond Chuen-Chung Chang

Copyright © 2014 Wenbin Wan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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