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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 307106, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/307106
Review Article

Pharmacology of Hallucinations: Several Mechanisms for One Single Symptom?

1Department of Addictionology, CHU Lille, 59037 Lille, France
2Department of Pharmacology, Univ Lille Nord de France, EA 1046, 59000 Lille, France
3Functional Neurosciences & Disorders Laboratory, Université Lille Nord de France, EA 4559, 59000 Lille, France
4Department of Pediatric Psychiatry, CHU Lille, 59037 Lille, France
5Department of Psychiatry, CHU Lille, 59037 Lille, France

Received 18 February 2014; Accepted 11 May 2014; Published 4 June 2014

Academic Editor: Changyang Gong

Copyright © 2014 Benjamin Rolland et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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