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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 308690, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/308690
Review Article

Calorie Restriction in Mammals and Simple Model Organisms

Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Biotecnologie Mediche e Forensi (DiBiMeF), Università di Palermo, Via Divisi 83, 90133 Palermo, Italy

Received 3 February 2014; Revised 13 April 2014; Accepted 21 April 2014; Published 6 May 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Passarino

Copyright © 2014 Giusi Taormina and Mario G. Mirisola. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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