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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 309183, 9 pages
Research Article

Fresh-Cut Pineapple as a New Carrier of Probiotic Lactic Acid Bacteria

1Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Science (SAFE), University of Foggia, Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy
2Promis Biotech s.r.l., Via Napoli 25, 71122 Foggia, Italy

Received 28 February 2014; Accepted 5 June 2014; Published 29 June 2014

Academic Editor: Laurian Zuidmeer-Jongejan

Copyright © 2014 Pasquale Russo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Due to the increasing interest for healthy foods, the feasibility of using fresh-cut fruits to vehicle probiotic microorganisms is arising scientific interest. With this aim, the survival of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, belonging to Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum species, was monitored on artificially inoculated pineapple pieces throughout storage. The main nutritional, physicochemical, and sensorial parameters of minimally processed pineapples were monitored. Finally, probiotic Lactobacillus were further investigated for their antagonistic effect against Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157:H7 on pineapple plugs. Our results show that at eight days of storage, the concentration of L. plantarum and L. fermentum on pineapples pieces ranged between 7.3 and 6.3 log cfu g−1, respectively, without affecting the final quality of the fresh-cut pineapple. The antagonistic assays indicated that L. plantarum was able to inhibit the growth of both pathogens, while L. fermentum was effective only against L. monocytogenes. This study suggests that both L. plantarum and L. fermentum could be successfully applied during processing of fresh-cut pineapples, contributing at the same time to inducing a protective effect against relevant foodborne pathogens.