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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 316204, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/316204
Review Article

Neuroprotective Effects of Lipoxin A4 in Central Nervous System Pathologies

1Departmento de Farmacologia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Campus Universitário, Trindade, 88049-900 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil
2Centro de Inovação e Ensaios Pré-Clínicos (CIEnP), Av. Luiz Boiteux Piazza, 1302-Canasvieiras, 88056-000 Florianópolis, SC, Brazil

Received 19 June 2014; Accepted 12 August 2014; Published 9 September 2014

Academic Editor: Alexandre de Paula Rogerio

Copyright © 2014 Alessandra Cadete Martini et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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