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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 318030, 19 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/318030
Review Article

The Role of microRNAs in the Regulation of Apoptosis in Lung Cancer and Its Application in Cancer Treatment

1Division of Genetics and Molecular Biology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
2Centre for Research in Biotechnology for Agriculture (CEBAR), University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Received 25 March 2014; Accepted 20 May 2014; Published 5 June 2014

Academic Editor: Dong Wang

Copyright © 2014 Norahayu Othman and Noor Hasima Nagoor. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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