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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 348728, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/348728
Research Article

EZH2 Silencing with RNA Interference Induces G2/M Arrest in Human Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

Department of Thoracic-Cardio Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100048, China

Received 4 January 2014; Accepted 11 February 2014; Published 18 March 2014

Academic Editor: Fumio Imazeki

Copyright © 2014 Hui Xia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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