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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 351903, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/351903
Research Article

Acute Ethanol-Induced Changes in Edema and Metabolite Concentrations in Rat Brain

1Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong 515041, China
2Department of Ultrasound, The Affiliated Yuebei People’s Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, Guangdong 512025, China
3Department of Neurosurgery, The Affiliated Yuebei People’s Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shaoguan, Guangdong 512025, China

Received 19 September 2013; Revised 12 February 2014; Accepted 12 February 2014; Published 25 March 2014

Academic Editor: Manuel F. Casanova

Copyright © 2014 Huimin Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu) differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.