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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 354608, 7 pages
Clinical Study

Tattoo-Associated Skin Reaction: The Importance of an Early Diagnosis and Proper Treatment

1Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Section of Dermatology, University of Florence Medical School, Hospital P. Palagi, 50125 Florence, Italy
2Department of Immunology and Allergology, University of Florence Medical School, 50125 Florence, Italy
3Division of Pathological Anatomy, University of Florence Medical School, 50125 Florence, Italy

Received 26 February 2014; Revised 21 June 2014; Accepted 9 July 2014; Published 23 July 2014

Academic Editor: Michael S. Kaminer

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Bassi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Tattoo is going to be a very common practice especially among young people and we are witnessing a gradual increase of numerous potential complications to tattoo placement which are often seen by physicians, but generally unknown to the public. The most common skin reactions to tattoo include a transient acute inflammatory reaction due to trauma of the skin with needles and medical complications such as superficial and deep local infections, systemic infections, allergic contact dermatitis, photodermatitis, granulomatous and lichenoid reactions, and skin diseases localized on tattooed area (eczema, psoriasis, lichen, and morphea). Next to these inflammatory skin reactions we have to consider also the possibility of the development of cutaneous conditions such as pseudolymphomatous reactions and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia. The aim of this study is to underline the importance of an early diagnosis by performing a histological examination especially when we are in front of suspected papulonodular lesions arising from a tattoo, followed by a proper treatment, since cutaneous neoplastic evolution is known to be a rare but possible complication.