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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 379607, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/379607
Research Article

Complete Cell Killing by Applying High Hydrostatic Pressure for Acellular Vascular Graft Preparation

1Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Fujishiro-dai, Suita, Osaka 565-8565, Japan
2Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1 Shin-machi, Hirakata City, Osaka 573-1010, Japan
3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585, Japan

Received 27 February 2014; Revised 10 April 2014; Accepted 11 April 2014; Published 30 April 2014

Academic Editor: Marília Gerhardt de Oliveira

Copyright © 2014 Atsushi Mahara et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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