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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 379748, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/379748
Research Article

Evaluation of Azathioprine-Induced Cytotoxicity in an In Vitro Rat Hepatocyte System

1Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A8
2Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3M2

Received 20 February 2014; Accepted 18 June 2014; Published 1 July 2014

Academic Editor: Thomas Minor

Copyright © 2014 Abdullah Al Maruf et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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