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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 390865, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/390865
Research Article

Dissociable Self Effects for Emotion Regulation: A Study of Chinese Major Depressive Outpatients

1Department of General Psychology, College of Psychology, Third Military Medical University, Street 30, Gaotanyan of Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038, China
2Radiology Department, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037, China
3School of Psychology, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715, China
4Xin Qiao Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038, China

Received 9 September 2013; Revised 19 February 2014; Accepted 6 March 2014; Published 3 April 2014

Academic Editor: Yong He

Copyright © 2014 Xiaoxia Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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