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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 401306, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/401306
Review Article

The Emerging Use of In Vivo Optical Imaging in the Study of Neurodegenerative Diseases

1Molecular PathoBiology Unit, Public Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, 1015 Arlington Street, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3E 3R2
2Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, 730 William Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3E 0W3

Received 9 May 2014; Revised 25 June 2014; Accepted 26 June 2014; Published 23 July 2014

Academic Editor: Mahendra P. Singh

Copyright © 2014 Aileen P. Patterson et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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