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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 406507, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/406507
Research Article

On the Relationships of Postcanine Tooth Size with Dietary Quality and Brain Volume in Primates: Implications for Hominin Evolution

1Departamento de Prehistoria y Arqueología, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Campus de Cartuja S/N, 18071 Granada, Spain
2Edificio Centro de Documentación Científica, Instituto Universitario de la Paz y los Conflictos, Universidad de Granada, C/Rector López Argüeta, 10871 Granada, Spain
3Anthropological Institute & Museum, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zürich, Switzerland
4Departamento de Ecología y Geología (Área de Paleontología), Facultad de Ciencias, Campus Universitario de Teatinos, 29071 Málaga, Spain
5Departamento de Biología Molecular y Bioquímica, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus Universitario de Teatinos, 29071 Málaga, Spain

Received 30 April 2013; Revised 15 December 2013; Accepted 16 December 2013; Published 30 January 2014

Academic Editor: Stephen E. Alway

Copyright © 2014 Juan Manuel Jiménez-Arenas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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