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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 415721, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/415721
Review Article

Expression of Stem Cell and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Markers in Circulating Tumor Cells of Breast Cancer Patients

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Moorenstraße 5, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany

Received 12 January 2014; Revised 25 March 2014; Accepted 26 March 2014; Published 8 May 2014

Academic Editor: Amanda B. Spurdle

Copyright © 2014 Natalia Krawczyk et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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