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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 429198, 22 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/429198
Review Article

New Researches and Application Progress of Commonly Used Optical Molecular Imaging Technology

1Department of Ultrasound Medicine, Laboratory of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging, The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510150, China
2Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 27 October 2013; Accepted 20 December 2013; Published 17 February 2014

Academic Editor: Weibo Cai

Copyright © 2014 Zhi-Yi Chen et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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