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BioMed Research International
Volume 2014, Article ID 436097, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/436097
Review Article

MicroRNA Roles in the NF-κB Signaling Pathway during Viral Infections

1State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology, Key Laboratory of Veterinary Parasitology of Gansu Province, Lanzhou Veterinary Research Institute, CAAS, Lanzhou, Gansu 730046, China
2College of Life Science and Engineering, Northwest University for Nationalities, Lanzhou 730030, China

Received 31 December 2013; Accepted 8 March 2014; Published 2 April 2014

Academic Editor: Zhisheng Dang

Copyright © 2014 Zeqian Gao et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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